Historical Notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

22nd Infantry Regiment (4th Infantry Division).

Stationed at Ft. McClellan, Al. as part of the 4th Division and moved to Ft. Benning, GA. 21 February 1941; transferred to Camp Gordon, GA. 27 December 1941 and redesignated as the 22nd Infantry Regiment (Motorized) on 09 September 1942; relocated to Ft. Dix, NJ. on 16 April 1943 and redesignated as the 22nd Infantry Regiment on 01 August 1943; moved to Camp Gordon Johnston, FL. 28 September 1943 and then to Ft. Jackson, SC. 01 December 1943; staged at Camp Kilmer, NJ. 08 January 1944 until departure from New York P/E, 18 January 1944; arrived England 29 January 1944 and assaulted Normandy France 06 June 1944 (attached to 2nd Armored Division 19 July - 02 August 1944) ; crossed into Belgium 06 September 1944 and entered Germany 11 September 1944; crossed into Luxembourg 12 December 1944, returned to Belgium 28 January 1945, and re-entered Germany 07 February 1945; returned to New York P/E 12 July 1945 and moved to Camp Butner, NC. 13 July 1945 where the Regiment was inactivated on 05 March 1946.

Campaigns : Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, Central Europe,

Source : Robert Rush, " Paschendale With Treebursts"

 

1st Battalion, 22nd Infantry (4th Infantry Division).

Stationed at Ft. Lewis, WA. in early 1960's. Departed Tacoma, WA. 21 July 1966; arrived Qui Nhon, VN. 06 August 1966; Pleiku August 1966 - February 1968 (attached to 101st Airborne Division from September through Mid-October 1966); Dak To/Pleiku March 1968; Pleiku/Plei Mrong April 1968 to June 1968; Pleiku July 1968; Pleiku/Ban Me Thout August 1968 to November 1968; Pleiku/Kontom December 1968; Pleiku/Suoi Doi January 1969; Pleiku/Kontum February 1969 to October 1969; Pleiku/An Khe November 1969 to December 1969; An Khe January 1970 to April 1970; Phu Nhieu October 1970; assigned I Field Force Vietnam at An Khe November 1970; Tuy Hoa December 1970 to April 1971; assigned to U.S. Army Forces, Military Region 2, Tuy Hoa May 1971 to 30 January 1972; returned to U.S.A. at Ft. Carson, CO.

For deployments after Vietnam, see STATION LIST

2nd Battalion (Mechanized), 22nd Infantry (4th Infantry Division and 25th Infantry Division)

Stationed at Ft. Lewis, WA. in early 1960's. Departed Tacoma, WA. 22 September 1966 ( Deployed to Vietnam from Ft. Lewis, WA. as a fully Mechanized Infantry Battalion serving with the 4th Infantry Division until transferred to the 25th Infantry Division on 01 August 1967.) Arrived Vietnam 09 October 1966; Bear Cat October 1966 to November 1966; Dau Tieng December 1966 to June 1967; Pleiku July 1967; transferred to the 25th Infantry Division 01 August 1967; Cu Chi/Tay Ninh August 1967 to February 1968; Dau Tieng/Hoc Mon March 1968; Dau Tieng/ Saigon August 1968 to October 1968; Dau Tieng November 1968 to June 1969; Dau Tieng/Cu Chi July 1969; Cu Chi/Bao Trai August 1969 to April 1970; Cu Chi May 1970 to 07 December 1970; Returned to U.S.A. at Ft. Carson, CO.

For deployments after Vietnam, see STATION LIST

3rd Battalion, 22nd Infantry (4th Infantry Division and 25th Infantry Division)

Stationed at Ft. Lewis, WA. in early 1960's. Departed Tacoma, WA. 22 September 1966 (Deployed to Vietnam from Ft. Lewis, WA. serving with the 4th Infantry Division until transferred to the 25th Infantry Division on 01 August 1967.) Arrived Vietnam 09 October 1966; Bear Cat October 1966 to November 1966; Dau Tieng December 1966 to June 1967; Pleiku July 1967; transferred to the 25th Infantry Division 01 August 1967; Cu Chi/Tay Ninh August 1967 to February 1968; Dau Tieng/Hoc Mon July 1968; Dau Tieng/Saigon August 1968 to October 1968; Dau Tieng November 1968 to June 1969; Dau Tieng/ Cu Chi July 1969; Cu Chi/Boa Trai August 1969 to January 1970; Tay Ninh February 1970 to April 1970; Thien Ngon May 1970; Katum June 1970; Tay Ninh July 1970; Dau Tieng August 1970; Tri Tam September 1970; Dau Tieng October 1970 to November 1970; Xuan Loc December 1970; Xuan Loc/ Long Binh Janurary 1971 to 20 April 1971; Returned to U.S.A. at Ft. Carson, CO.

For deployments after Vietnam, see STATION LIST

4th Battalion, 22nd Infantry

The 4th Battalion, 22nd Infantry Regiment was constituted in the Regular Army as Companies D and E, 13th Infantry, on 13 May 1861.  Later, they were consolidated and redesignated as Company D 22nd Infantry.  During this period, the unit participated in campaigns against the Sioux Nation during the battles of Little Big Horn and Pine Ridge.

     On 20 June 1898, D Company became the first American infantry unit to land on Cuban soil, in the process earning a battle streamer for the Battle of Santiago.

     January 1900 found the unit in the Philippines at the outset of a five-year campaign against the Moros.  Three more battle streamers were added to the unitís colors:  Mindanao, Manila, and Luzon.

     After World War I, Company D and the rest of the 22nd Infantry Regiment were reassigned to the 4th Infantry Division.  The unit landed on Omaha Beach in Normandy on June 6, 1944.  Fighting through France, Holland, Belgium, and Germany, the unit distinguished itself in battle in the Huertgen Forest, along the Siegfried Line, and during the Battle of the Bulge.

     On 25 November 1986, the 4th Battalion was activated at Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, as an organic element of the 2nd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division (Light).    The battalion trained at locations around the Pacific Basin, including Thailand, Malaysia, Korea, and Japan.  The unit deployed to the Joint Readiness Training Center at Fort Chaffee, Arkansas, in 1991, and to the island of Kauai in 1992 following that islandís devastation at the hands of Hurricane Iniki.

     In 1994, the 4th Battalion was chosen to undergo a special training scenario at the Joint Readiness Training Center (re-located to Fort Polk, Louisiana) in Peace Enforcement Operations.  Following this highly successful training rotation, the 4th Battalion was selected to assume duties in the Republic of Haiti in support of Operation UPHOLD DEMOCRACY.  Arriving in Port-au-Prince on 13 January 1995, the battalion relieved the 1st Battalion 22nd Infantry, from the 10th Mountain Division, and took responsibility for providing security for Haitian president Jean-Bertrand Aristide.  After 60 days, the battalion returned to Hawaii following the transfer of responsibility to the United Nations Mission in Haiti.  For itís efforts in Haiti, the battalion was awarded the Joint Meritorious Unit Award by the Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command.

     The battalionís colors were cased for the last time in an inactivation ceremony on June 28, 1995.  Lieutenant Colonel Edwin F. Davis, Jr., the last commander of the battalion, with a voice choked with emotion, bade his soldiers farewell, stating, ďThis battalion cased its colors today as a success, and will be remembered as such!  It is because of soldiers on the field today that I am damn proud to be a soldier, and a Regular!Ē

     The inactivation was effective 15 July 1995.  Those soldiers who still had to complete their tour were reassigned to other units in the 2nd Brigade (1st Battalion 14th Infantry, 1st Battalion 21st Infantry, 1st Battalion 27th Infantry).

 

 

 

Tradition, The 22nd Infantry Regiment Society

Formed at the end of World War II as the 22nd Infantry Officer's Association, membership was opened in the early 1950's to all men, officer and enlisted alike, who had served with the Regiment in World War II. In the early 1990's, a decision was made to broaden the membership to include those who served in Vietnam, the Cold War, and those in current units.

In 1995, the name was changed to the 22nd Infantry Regiment Society. Current membership is made up of members from World War II, Cold War, Vietnam, Somalia/Haiti, and the Current Units plus a number of Associate Members from supporting units and families and friends of members.

 

"Deeds Not Words"

Have you ever wondered where we got the official motto "Deeds Not Words" ? I have and still don't know the answer but I have a theory. In reading the history of the 22nd Infantry Regiment in the Philippines, I found a reference to General Orders No. 10, dated June 4th, 1900. the order read, "Captain George J. Godfrey, 22nd U.S. Infantry. Killed in action. Shot through the heart. His military record is closed. A brilliant career ended. Deeds, silent symbols more potent than words proclaimed his soldier worth.."

My speculation is that when official regimental crests and motto's were established in the 1920's, this order eulogizing a great infantryman who had fought in Cuba and the Philippines played a part in the establishment of our official motto - Deeds Not Words! And our Regiment has lived up to the motto. If any of you have real facts or theories on the beginning of our motto, sent them to me and I will publish them.

 

 

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